Blogging Advice: ARC Rants and Raves and How To Request Them From The Publisher

The hot topic in the bookish community that always seems to get everyone all riled up is ARCs, and since I have no problem ranting about things that annoy me, I thought why not talk about ARCs. But this post is not a rant. I’d like to think of it as more of a discussion with some helpful tips for bloggers. (And maybe a rant.)

I know we’ve all requested an ARC just to see if we would get approved. I’m guilty of doing this on more than one occasion. You might not have any interest in the book until you hear about it from other bloggers who Raved over it. But something crazy happens, and all of a sudden you have 20 ARCs on your NetGalley dashboard, and you’re wondering how you will possibly read all the books. What happens is you either feel guilty and start plowing through the ARCs to make it on time for the pub date or you just close out your web browser and don’t log back into NetGalley until you feel like tackling your ARCs. I’m the type of person who will feel guilty and start marathon reading and writing.

This post is not meant to offend anyone who requests a book and doesn’t review but more to show the negative and positive aspects of requesting ARCs. I also thought I’d give a few tips about where you can find ARCs and how to request them.

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  • You were given the book under the pretense that you were planning to read and review the book. It’s only fair and decent that you return the favor by at least attempting to read the book, even if it’s the worst piece of trash you’ve ever read and want to Rant all day about it.
  • The review copy sitting on your shelf or Kindle has now gone to waste, and therefore, someone who wanted to read the book no longer has the opportunity because the publisher hit their max limit. There’s nothing I hate more than people who brag about books they’ve gotten to the people who did not receive the same title, only to say, “Poor me, I have so many ARCs I can’t read them all.” This infuriates the people who did not get an ARC when you act all cavalier about not reading the book they would’ve read and reviewed. And it’s also immature.
  • You’re not doing yourself any favors for future approvals if you don’t review the books you are given. There’s nothing to say that you wouldn’t get approved for another book, but if the publisher keeps track of what blogs they give books, then I’d say your chance of another hot release is probably lower than if you had sent in your review. Sending your review is also a good way to establish a rapport with a publicist, which can increase your chances of getting more ARCs.
  • If you requested the book on NetGalley, your rating will suffer because of it, which will lead to less approvals. The average approval rating on NetGalley is 80%, so keep reading and reviewing if you want to keep that score up.
  • If you received a copy on Edelweiss, the book is archived with no option to download if you don’t read it by the date indicated. I noticed with NetGalley that even after the book is archived you can download the book to your Kindle or Adobe Digital Editions Apps, but Edelweiss does not have this feature. The book is only available during the specified time period. You can’t wait until you feel like reading it when you get approved on Edelweiss. It’s also incredibly hard to get approvals on that site. Not reviewing a book will definitely not help with future requests.

  • You get to read a new release months ahead of the general pubic. And you know how the most anticipated book of the year ends! That’s an exciting opportunity that most of us take for granted. ARCs are a privilege. You are not entitled to ARCs just because you’re a blogger. That’s something to keep in mind. It’s like getting a driver’s license—it’s a privilege not a right. I’m always extra thankful for getting the chance to review an unpublished book.
  • Once you’re on a publisher’s mailing list, you get the opportunity to choose which books you want to review, take part in blog tours, receive exclusive content, and you if you’re lucky, you might also score a guest post or interview from the author. This is another awesome perk of getting those ARCs read and reviewed in a reasonable time frame.
  • If you review enough books, the publisher might add you to their auto-approval list. And maybe you’ll even score some free books for a giveaway courtesy of the publisher.

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  • NetGalley: The easiest source for ARCs is NetGalley. All you have to do is sign up for an account, link your blog and social media accounts, and add some basic information about your reading preferences. You have the option to “Read Now” or browse through titles to request. Some people are hesitant about requesting a book, but it doesn’t hurt to ask. You only have to click one button. It’s that simple.
  • Edelweiss: I was approved for 1/5 books I requested on Edelweiss, and this site is notoriously known for denying mass amounts of bloggers ARCs. From what I’ve read, they’re more likely to grant a request to a librarian than a blogger. You still have the chance of scoring an ARC, but I would say your chances are lower than if you requested the book on NetGalley.
  • Penguin First To Read: This is another site through Penguin where you can get ARCs. I do not like this site or understand the purpose of the points system. It says you can get more points by sharing and liking posts, yet the buttons are always grayed out when I click on them. You can also get more points by reading excerpts. I haven’t gotten any points by reading excerpts, but you better believe the button where you can buy the book always works.
  • Blogging for Books: I have never found anything I like on this site to even ask for a copy, but I know some bloggers who have received good books from this site. It’s free to sign up for an account. They have a very limited selection. It’s nothing like NetGalley in terms of books. If you were already denied a copy of the book from NetGalley, you cannot ask for one on this site.
  • SocialbookCo: To become a member you have to fill out the form and get approved for the Book Review Program. I was approved, but I haven’t found any titles I want to request. You also get commission if you review a book and people you referred buy it through their site. At the moment, they have Me Before You, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, and a few others for review. I’ve already read two of them and don’t have interest in the rest. But at least they have some titles you might want to check out for free.
  • You can contact the publishers directly via email or snail mail. You will need to know which publisher you want to contact for a particular book, and from there, you will need to know which imprint to find the correct mailbox to send the request. The Big Five Publishers are Simon & Schuster, Macmillan, Hachette Book Group, Harper Collins, and Penguin Random House. That should be enough to get you started and dig from there to find the right imprint. There are smaller publishers that you can also contact directly if you know what you’re looking for. I’m on several publishers mailing lists for review copies, blog tours, interviews, and guest posts, though I usually only ask for the books.

I know there are more sites, and I don’t use them, but if I missed any ARC sites you think I should’ve included, please let me know in the comments. 

what-are-your-thoughts-pink-header

XO,

    Jill

Come Stalk Me On Social Media

Twitter | Goodreads |Instagram


96 thoughts on “Blogging Advice: ARC Rants and Raves and How To Request Them From The Publisher

  1. This is such a great post about ARC’s,Jill.I agree with everything you said.I remember when I was so hesitant to request arcs but now Netgalley seems so simple and easy.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve had the most luck with NetGalley and Penguin’s First to Read. With the points on First to Read, there’s an option when requesting books for a guaranteed copy, in which you would use the specific number of points to get a guarnteed copy of a book you are interested in reviewing. I haven’t had any luck on Edelweiss and I haven’t tried out the other ones yet.

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    1. Same here. NetGalley has been very good to me. I have some points on First to Read, but when I try to do what they say to earn points, none of the buttons work. Instead, I went to the publisher directly and they sent me the copies.

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  3. Great post!
    I’ve (surprisingly) gotten pretty good at not going overboard and requesting too many ARCs on NetGalley.Thank God because when I first signed up, I requested way too many because I did not think I’d get approved and I still have some of those sitting on my shelves to read/review. OOPS. It’s definitely a great source though – you just have to be able to control yourself and prioritize your reading so you don’t end up disappointing publishers.

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    1. Thanks, Kourtni! 🙂 I went crazy with them when I started blogging and learned my lesson real quick. I can only request what I know I can handle now. Control is definitely the biggest part of requesting ARCs. It’s always the one you want that doesn’t get approved because your ratio is horrible.

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  4. I use blogging for books and I like it, however sometimes the have nothing that grabs my attention. I also like that you can only request one book at a time and then after you review it you may request another. It keeps you from getting overloaded. I also try to only keep 5 or less review books on my Netgalley account at a time 😀 Great post!

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    1. That does help with keeping your requests down. I haven’t had any luck with that site. I mentioned it to a publicist and she just sent me the books I was looking for after I told her the site didn’t work for me. I’m the same way. I think right now I have around 5 or 6 on NetGalley and a few paper ARCs. I don’t like to overload myself too much because the ARCs pile up quick. I do read a lot of ARCs though. 🙂

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  5. I would also add one more thing: following publicists on twitter. They sometimes tweet about having ARCs for bloggers and ask who’d like a copy. They usually go pretty fast, but it’s a great opportunity for smaller bloggers. I got my first few arcs that way before even sending proof requests via email.

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    1. I do the same thing. I completely agree with you. I talk to a fair amount of publicists on Twitter, and that has helped me to make a connection with them and build a rapport. I haven’t gotten any ARCs directly from a tweet, but I have gotten them through a DM or even went to the publicist after the fact and scored an ARC via email.

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    1. I do the same thing. And if I can’t get a digital copy through those sites, I send an email to the publicist with more information about my blog. NetGalley and Edelweiss are sometimes so slow that I find it’s often faster to send an email with my request, depending on the publisher.

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  6. Requesting ARCs directly from the publisher can be a beast to tackle. It can be difficult to determine who exactly you’re supposed to email and it’s frustrating when you never receive acknowledgement of your request, though I sometimes have received ARCs anyways. I do love the privileges of blogging even though to be successful you definitely put in some work 😀 Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! 🙂 I avoided asking the publishers directly until about two months ago. I haven’t had a single publisher turn me down for an ARC request since. I think it’s all about the approach, your stats, and the book in question. It’s not easy to find all the email addresses or determine which imprint you’re looking for. I spent a fair amount of time outlining all that before I sent my emails. I agree. To get something in return you really do need to put the work into it. 🙂

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  7. I’m so sad to say I fall into the bad blogger category for now. I’ve had no time for the 2 ARCs released in November on my NetGalley shelf. I will read them a little late and review as soon as possible, but I feel terrible. I usually try to get the review ready 5 days before publication max.
    On a brighter side, I’m staying away from ARCs now, no more requests, and boy that is freedom! I’ll get back to it later, I’m sure a title will come around and make my finger twitch, but I’ll behave for as long as possible! Harper Collins never approved of my requests, it happened to two other non-native so I guess it might be a rule of their 😦 (Still not over the fact I was denied for The Fire Child, even though I bought and read anyway xD)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You have 2 ARCs, I’d hardly consider you a delinquent blogger. 🙂 I’m talking about the people who hang onto 10 plus books with no intention to read, and then they complain that they’re overloaded with ARCs. Simple solution- stop requesting them, right? 🙂 I’m the same way with feeling guilty about not reading them on time. I always drop what I’m doing to get the review up in time. Less ARCs definitely equals freedom, but I like free advance releases too much. 🙂 It’s funny because I’ve been approved for Harper Collins imprints and I’m on some of their mailing lists, but anything that is published directly by Harper Collins never seems to get an approval for me either. They must be the hardest publisher to get ARCs from. I might’ve gotten one from them, but I’m not even sure that was one of their books.

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  8. A stunning post Jilly. 🙂

    Totally agree with Irena – bookdustmagic as following the publicists and publishers on Twitter is a great way to get ARC’s but also to keep up with general book info for those publishers.

    Nice to see you mention Netgalley to as it’s mentioned at times and seems to be that some bloggers think it’s OK to have loads of e-Arc’s way past release date but if other bloggers have real paper arc’s and they haven’t reviewed them then it’s wrong, sigh, an arc is an arc.

    Mailing lists are great, especially when you get press releases for books though there not technically arc’s at times as sometime the publisher doesn’t send out press releases until after the release date. Surprise book mail is always great.

    Arc’s are most certainly a privilege and not a given and it’s awesome but and it’s a big BUT be we small or big blogs they aren’t and shouldn’t be a given but as an extra they are a nice thing.

    Bloggers certainly shouldn’t request arc’s that they don’t want to read though as it takes it away from other bloggers who would have loved a chance at the book but now can’t – it’s your point in the post and I totally agree. 🙂

    That goes for hyped books to, it’s unfair of bloggers just to request a hyped book that they have no interest in just because they think it will improve there followers, etc by saying “look at me I’ve got this”.

    We’re all bloggers together, different genres and different countries and arc’s are to be shared if we’re lucky enough to be considered for them SO ONLY REQUEST BOOKS YOU ARE INTERESTED IN!! – oh, sorry my caps lock was on, didn’t realise but it’s a valid point! 🙂

    Mailing lists are awesome especially when you get a chance to have one of your favourite authors on your blog, I was lucky enough for that to happen to me and it was amazing. 🙂

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    1. Thank you! 🙂 This is an extra long comment for you. I know how much you love this topic. I love the mailing lists for bloggers. I’m on quite a few now and asked to be on a few more. Just today alone, not including last week, I’ve had publicists ask me which books I wanted to read, which is such a cool perk. I’m not one of those bloggers who would ask for a book and not read and review it, so it’s nice to start getting emails that I’m on legit mailing lists and have my pick of the 2017 catalog. 🙂 Getting a copy of your favorite author’s new book is hands-down the best thing about ARCs and blogging. I got this YA one at the end of the summer that was so awesome! I hate that so many people request books they don’t have any plan to read. I always plan to read every book I ask for, and then I prioritize them each month with the rest of my TBR to coincide with the pub date.

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  9. Brilliant post, Jill!

    I hate when people get ARCs just for the sake of having them. I’m behind on a few of my ARCs (because I’m a sow reader), but I definitely eventually make my way all through them. I’ve never been approved for anything on Edelweiss, haha. I think mine is a mix of being in Australia and being a blogger. I’ve pretty much given up on that site now. Netgalley is great though especially when Australian publishers put up some of the popular YA releases 😂 I’ve only recently started contacting publishers and I was pretty nervous sending the first email, but after that it was surprisingly easy and everyone I’ve spoken to has been super nice!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Lauren! 🙂 I love NetGalley. It’s my favorite site to request books. It’s funny you mention that because I really wanted Replica, and they were only giving it to bloggers in Australia, so I guess that worked in your favor. 🙂 I haven’t seen it available for any other country. I’ve had an awesome response from publishers lately. I’m glad you’re finding the same thing. 🙂

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      1. I feel like the Aus publishers have really upped their game with Netgalley because even when I first started blogging earlier in the year they didn’t really have anything available and now they seem to always put up the popular YA releases. I wish I could give you temporary Australian Netgalley status, haha!!

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  10. I’m currently only using Netgalley and still trying to learn how to navigate Edelweiss. You make a lot of valid points there, esp. the part where you mentioned the feedback ratio must reach up to 80%. When I signed up for Netgalley & received my first ARCs I have no idea this feedback ratio existed until I saw it in a book tag. (Netgalley book tag, to be precise). And that’s how I figured out why I got lesser and lesser approvals, & some others ignored. I’m trying to get my ratings back up and am now at 50 something percent. I also often fail at meeting deadlines but no matter how late I still post a finalized review of that ARC. Does that help anything? And yeah, getting ARCs are such a privilege it makes me guilty when I can’t post my reviews on time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I learned the feedback ratio lesson in the beginning. It’s something I think most of us don’t know until we stop getting approvals. I also try to post a review even if I’m late in doing so. I feel like it’s only right that I post my review when I got the book for free.

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  11. Love this!! I usually just use Netgalley but I’m right there with you about the guilty part because i will try my hardest to plow through them near the publishing date! ARC’s are such a hassle but also so nice when it comes to book blogging. You nailed it though because there are Rants and Raves about ARC’s and these are so true! Great post, I love it :).

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  12. Great post! I’ve signed up for NetGalley but I haven’t made any requests just yet. My TBR is already massive and so I’m afraid of adding even more to it. But I think ARCs are a great opportunity to explore the publishing community. This is a really helpful post! Thanks! 😀

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    1. Thank you! 🙂 ARCs are definitely great when you want to read a new release from your favorite author. Getting approved for a Kasie West book was one of the highlights of blogging for me because I’m such a huge fan. It really is nice. Thank you! I’m glad you found it useful. 🙂

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  13. This is an important topic to bring up. Some people do get snobby about ARCs. Other bloggers really don’t like that attitude. It’s not polite. Come on, people, behave. Also, I think the pressure on all bloggers to request ARCs (from some sources) is lame. I know I don’t have time to request a bunch, so I don’t. Do I feel my blog will suffer because of it? Hope not. 😛 Seriously, I’ll stick to my limits, and leave it at that.

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    1. Thanks! I thought it might be helpful to some bloggers. I know what you mean. Some people read only ARCs and seem to rub it in everyone’s face that they got some book no one else was lucky enough to get. And I think some people might take that harder than others. I like ARCs because they’re free and I plan to read and review them and also because I enjoy reading books ahead of time. I don’t request ARCs just because I think they’ll be popular on my blog. I only ask for books I want to read and would enjoy. I know some people seem to ask for everything that’s hot and then complain about all of them. A lot of bloggers don’t read ARCs. It’s time consuming. I don’t blame you for staying away from them. They can be a bit much sometimes with all the pub dates.

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  14. YES TO EVERYTHING JILL !!

    I hate it when I don’t get approved for a book (which in itself is fine) but people who bought it keep rubbing it Under my nose and contemplating whether to read it or not. YOU SHOULD’VE CONTEMPLATED BEFORE ASKING FOR IT THANK YOU VERY MUCH. Ayway hahaha.

    I think Netgalley has that time restriction two, i had that problem with books twice, one for which I was able to contact the publishers directly and asked that they send me a copy via email which they kindly did and the other I just didn’t know what to do about. If there’s a way I don’t know about, please do tell 😀

    And about Social BookCo, I actually was sent a book from my wishlist that wasn’t on the list of available books (which is still on its way) so even though you’re not interested in the books there, they might still get you one that you really want, and that’s what I really love about that program!

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    1. Right? I hate when people brag about their books. It’s so annoying. I know some people who got a copy of a book I was dying to read and still haven’t read the book! And I got denied a copy when I’m a real fan of the author. I’m over it now, but back then, I was so annoyed with ARCs and how they were being given out. Oh really? I didn’t know I could add books to a wishlist and they might send them. Thanks for the tip, Fadwa! 🙂 I sometimes think maybe I just don’t have any patience when I go on some of the sites. And I’m one of those decisive shoppers who knows what they want. If I don’t see the book I want right away, I usually sign out. I need to be more patient I see. 🙂

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  15. Great post Jill, I completely agree with all your points. I only really request ARCs through NetGalley, mainly because before your post it was one of the only ones I was aware actually existed to request ARCs (other than Edelweiss, which I cannot get my head around for the life of me, and actually emailing the publishers, which I am still not brave enough to even contemplate doing at the moment). I always try and post my reviews before the book has been published, after all I feel that’s kind of the point of ARCs isn’t it, to get reviews out there before the release of the actual book. I’m on top of my reviews at the moment but I have three outstanding (none being released until next year) so until I’ve read and reviewed them I’m holding off requesting anymore.
    I’m always careful about the ARCs I do request, just because I know that I need to have the time to read and review them, and like you said there’s only a limit amount the publishers will approve. If I’m not too keen on a book I could be taking it away from someone who really wants to read it.
    I love your advice on all the different platforms to request ARCs as well, at the moment I’m fine with NetGalley but if I ever decide to branch out from that I’ll check your post again for more info! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Beth! 🙂 I used to stick with just NetGalley until I got on a few publishers mailing lists and started getting the nerve to ask for them. So far, I’ve had all good experiences with the publishers from all of the major houses. It’s been going really well, actually. I noticed that NetGalley tells you what the publishers are looking for under their profiles. That also helps when sending an email request. I’ve really only had luck with NetGalley and once on Edelweiss. I’ve also had luck with contacting publishers directly. I’ve got a lot of good reads for 2017 that way. It’s definitely worth the time to write and send the emails. 🙂

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      1. That’s all right, I think my next step is to email publishers and speak to them directly. I’ll be sure to check out their NetGalley profiles for ideas on writing the email so thanks for that advice! 😀 Also it’s great you have so many books for 2017. What ones have you got so far?
        I haven’t even bothered with Edelweiss, at the moment I’m fine with NetGalley for eARCs, and once I’ve got through the ones on my to-read list I’ll start trying to email publishers as well! 😀

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        1. For 2017, I have Gilded Cage, The Devil Crept In, I See You, The Bone Witch, The Roanoke Girls, Lola, Wintersong, and I have a few more on the way from the publishers. I should have them sometime in the next week. I’m still not done requesting. 😂 I read mostly ARCs. That’s why you see less older books on my blog.

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    1. Exactly! There’s some serious ARC drama at times. Not from me but I’ve seen it on Twitter. People get crazy about ARCs. It is a lot of work to keep up with pub dates and get them reviewed on time. I don’t blame you for skipping on them. It’s a nice perk though. I love reading books months before the public. Thank you! 🙂

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  16. This is a great post, I honestly didn’t know how people got ARCs before reading. Do you have to have a big blog following to get your requests approved? (because I don’t but I would want to get an ARC)

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    1. Thank you! 🙂 Some of the bigger publishers require 1,000 followers. If you go on NetGalley and look at the publishers profiles, it will tell you what they look for in your profile and how many followers you need and what kind of stats they’re looking. I was approved for books within the first few weeks of blogging. I think it all depends on the book and the publisher. I say give it a shot. The worst they can say is no. 🙂 Make sure you have a decent amount of reviews and not a bunch of tags and memes. I know that’s a turn off for most publishers if they don’t see enough reviews.

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  17. I love ARCs! I just started with NetGalley over the summer, and I’ve already been approved for so many ARCs that I wasn’t expecting! And even though my rating on NetGalley is low (38% right now), somehow I keep getting approved for more books, and now I’ve got a bit of a backlog (cough – 13 books !). So I don’t know that the rating is really everything that they look at when approving – mine has never been very high, as I requested 5 or 6 books to begin with thinking I’d be denied for them all, but nope.
    At least most of the ARCs I have aren’t set to publish anytime soon, so I have every intention of getting my reviews ready for posting on publication date. I have yet to be accepted for a popular YA release though, so the YA books must be harder to get / more people requesting.
    ARCs are just really tempting. It’s so easy to click that Request button on NetGalley! I haven’t tried any of the other sites – kinda got my hands full with NetGalley right now!

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    1. The same thing happened to me when I first used NetGalley. I got so excited and ended up with loads of books to read. I finished them all and then slowed down. 🙂 I was around your ratio back then. It was so hard to read and review all of them because I was in a massive slump at the time. Sometimes, reading books you don’t want to read and only out of obligation puts you in a slump. 13 book is a lot. You’d have to read nothing but ARCs to get rid of all those. Good luck with your pile. 🙂 Yeah, I wouldn’t recommend any more sites for you at the moment. You’ll be reading those until the beginning of 2017.

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      1. Yep – for sure! I’m so behind. And I’m nowhere near my reading goal of 100 books this year.
        I want to catch up with my NetGalleys because I’d like to try some of the “read now” books at some point and venture out and try new authors.
        Yeah, I’m such a mood reader, and already my November (and my October) is filled with “have to read” books that I’m feeling a bit irritated right now. My October was super busy and I wasn’t able to read as much that month, but hopefully November will be a bit slower. Plus it helps that the book club I’m in takes a break this time of year, so I have one less “have to” read book for a few months.

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  18. I completely agree with everything you said in this! I’m a lot like you when it comes to ARCs. I feel guilty and start marathon reading, which is why I’ve forced myself to never over request again. The current ARCs I have from NetGalley are very few and spaced out because I know my limitations now lol. And YES to what you said about receiving ARCs and not reading. In that instance (as far as physical ARCs go) I would definitely pass the ARC on to someone who I know would read and review it. Rather than letting it go to waste, you know? Also, I’ve experienced the same thing as you with Penguin First To Read. I see reviews from others on there but I swear I can’t figure the website out and I never get points for reading excerpts or anything either. I gave up on it. 😂

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    1. I’d do the same thing. If I had a physical ARC I couldn’t read, I’d ask someone else if they wanted to read it. It’s a shame that you can’t do that with ebooks because some books I didn’t care for right away, and I’m sure another blogger would’ve loved to read them. Penguin First is so weird. I have no idea how to earn points when the buttons never work. 😂

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  19. Great post Jillian. I discovered the world of ARCs recently and joined NetGalley in July of this year. I over-requested books at first because I didn’t think that I would get approved.However, I got so many approvals that at one time I had 33 books on my bookshelf. I had requested all the books in a period of three days so everything came at once. Like you, I would feel bad if I failed to review an ARC so I ended up doing a marathon and spending all my evenings reading them like I was studying for an exam. I have learned about pacing my requests now.

    I once saw someone mention that they didn’t get a chance to read an ARC that they had gotten. She was using the same app that I use for ebooks where books expire in 54 days so the book expired. I felt bad about it especially because I really really wanted to read the book but couldn’t get approved because of my location(that happens a lot). I agree with you that the ARCs are definitely not a right to us but a privilege.

    I don’t know any of the other sites that you have mentioned though. This is quite an informative post.

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    1. Thanks, Diana! 🙂 I made the same mistake. I thought I’d improve my chances of getting an ARC if I asked for a lot and that backfired when all the approvals started coming in. I also feel like I’m studying or doing something for work when I have to marathon read a bunch of ARCs. I noticed it puts me under a lot of unnecessary stress. Then there’s the approvals that took months to get and you’re not interested in the book by the time it comes and now have to read another books that’s not even an ARC. Thanks! I hope you find some books on these other sites. I don’t think they have as many country restrictions as NetGalley.

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  20. Excellent post to put things in perspective again! Are there really people who get review copies and NEVER review them? I admit, I’m later than intended sometimes, but NEVER? Now that’s BAD. There should be a blogger police for that! Penguin’s First to Read is only open to US residents still, sadly, but I’ve been extremely fortunate when it comes to my Edelweiss review copies. I requested a bunch of them 6 months ago or so and got approved for all of them. Which came as quite of a shock since they were all from Harper Collins :D. My NG rating has been 80%+ for months on end but I keep getting denied for pretty much anything anyhow. It will always remain a surprise to see if something works for you or not! I’m always thinking that if I go for relatively unknown books by unknown authors, and a crappy book cover on top of it, that access will be granted FOR SURE. But nope! 😉

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    1. Thanks, Anne! 🙂 Yes, there are people who have ARCs from a year ago and have no plan to read them. And I bet you would’ve loved to read some of these books they couldn’t bother to read. We should all do an ARC swap. This way other people could have the chance to read them. Wow, that’s a surprise. Harper Collins is notorious for denying everyone. I don’t think I’ve ever gotten one of their books, yet I work with publicists from their imprints who send me books no problem. I don’t get it. I figured out what they were looking for in the NG profile. Each publisher has their own list of requirements that should be present in your profile. I don’t think all of them dig through your blog and want the stats on your profile page. That’s so weird you get approved on Edelweiss and not NetGalley. I wonder if it’s a country restriction.

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      1. That’s really lame. Yeah, ARC swapping would be awesome! If not for people like me who are living in Europe and have ridiculous shipping costs when it comes to the physical ones ;). I know right?! It was probably a fluke, lol. Yeah, my NG pretty much only contains my stats and interests these days *shrugs*. I heard they look at your disapproval rate as well. Which could be a vicious cycle.

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        1. Too bad about the shipping. I’d be happy to send you books if it were cheaper. My NetGalley profile is now boring stats as well. Conveniently enough, a publisher that normally approves all of my requests just denied one after I added my stats, yet I have everything they’re asking for. Go figure! 🙂

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  21. Wow. This post is amazing. I agree with the fact that if one requests for ARCs then they should read and review them within the time limit. I had been approved of two ARCs from net galley and I didn’t request after that because I am uncomfortable with ebooks. Then I took the leap of faith and mailed Bloomsbury. They are such lovely people. They asked me my choice if genre and send me their current release. Since then I have received many review copies(never ARCs though) and I have reviewed them in time. But right now I have 9 books to complete and there is so little time and I feel so guilty.

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    1. Thanks! 🙂 I also had really good luck with emailing publishers. The same thing happened to me. They sent me their catalogs and gave me my pick of books. I felt bad asking for more than two from each publisher even though I read really fast. I think I have about 9 as well and more on the way. Plus all of the books I need to read on kindle and on my shelf. 😂

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        1. That is a bummer. It’s not as easy as NetGalley. You have to earn points to get considered for a book. I asked for my first one last night, and it said they’ll let me know on November 10th. I guess they pick people at random for that site. Harper Collins has never approved me either, but I’ve gotten ARCs from Penguin and the Hatchette and HC imprints. I think if you try their imprints first and review some of those books that it might help with approvals later on.

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  22. I agree 100%, I make my arcs a priority & try to keep my request to a minimum. Currently I have 5 books to read on Netgalley & 4 are 2017 releases. I also learned the hard way with Netgalley & now I make sure to check publication dates because I aim to have my review up 1 to 2 weeks before release date. I try to only request books that give me ample time to get to since I enjoy reading from my personal library at home as well. One thing though, Netgalley has a tendency to approve books man months later when they’re already a distant memory. On two occasions (one being the book I am reading next) they approved books after publication date which just sucks. Because of the 1 book that I have that was approved way after pub date, all other requests remain in pending status. I wish they would just archive them, Ink and Bone although I LOVED was approved for me in October & it was a June release I requested in advance. I have never attempted to contact a publisher directly just because I’m not ready for that & I’m happy with Netgalley so far. One of the main reasons I stopped watching a ton of Booktubers channels was that I would see them obtain some highly sought after ARCS only to forget about them & unabashedly admit to not getting around to reading them. Sucks for the reader on the other side of the screen who reads for fun & not just to draw in followers. One day in the near future maybe I’ll woman up & do so lol. Excellent post Jill!!!

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    1. I can’t stand when I get a NetGalley approval after the pub date. Then, I wonder if I need to prioritize that one or not. It’s not like it’s an ARC after the pub date, but it still annoys me that I’m now behind schedule. I got approved for Ink and Bone after I bought it on a kindle sale. I was kinda bummed about that. Oh I know. I can’t stand that when there’s a book I wanted to read that goes to someone who doesn’t even read the ARC. I often wonder how someone with 40 followers gets a hype book over me or someone with more followers when the publishers profiles clearly say they’re looking for people who have 1,000 or more followers. That always perplexes me when I see a review from a blogger who just started when giving them the ARC clearly deviates from what the publisher is looking for and gives them zero visibility. Thanks, Lilly! 🙂

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      1. I think you do have to prioritize it cuz ever since I got Fractured, I have no approvals whatsoever. It’s like my NetGalley account just up & froze. All my previous requests Re sitting in pending status so I KNOW it’s the Fractured ARC. So upsetting cuz it should be noted that I was approved after publication date & that I requested the ARC before pub date smh. If anything, they should be lax with those scenarios but since they’re not, I’m reading it after Heartless. I hear it’s a controversial one so that eases my feelings of being pressured into getting it out of my queue, at least it’s a good one lol. I stay wondering why brand spanking new bloggers get the ARCS they do & why more established blogs get denied smh. This is why I’m not rushing to email publishers directly until I’m comfortable with my blog & stats cuz I hate rejection haha! I actually didn’t know that publicists on twitter giveaway ARCS though so good to know Jill 😉 not that I know who any of them are anyways though 🙈😂🙈😂

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        1. I completely agree. I noticed The Bone Witch dropped off my list even though I have it on my kindle. Then the approvals starting getting less or just sitting there. I’m still getting approvals, but I’m getting more rejections than normal, which is crazy because I’m keeping my ratio at 80% and I updated my profile, per the publisher’s request. I wonder if they look at what books you have and say nope not gonna happen until you read that one. It’s a lot of pressure when that happens. Right? How do new bloggers get hot ARCs when publishers have these super strict limits? It makes no sense to me. Publicists are good people to know. I’ve had all good experiences so far. I highly recommend it. 🙂 A lot of times if you don’t get an ARC they’ll send it to you if you ask. I wrote a bad review about a book a few days ago and sent it to the publicist because she emailed me and then I got denied for another book from them the next day. They say honest opinion. Clearly that’s not what they’re looking for. 😂

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          1. That’s happened to me before, good thing that you can still submit feedback even though it’s archived. That’s odd though cuz Bonewitch is still sitting in my queue. I still get approvals for other books though. I really think Fractured is messing with my approvals which is silly if it is. Either way, I’m reading it next & we’ll see. I think Edelweiss is probably what new bloggers might use to their advantage. It’s more of a state your case & we’ll see if its sitting that please your email😃

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            1. That’s weird. The Bone Witch disappeared on me a month ago for no reason. I’ve had it for months. Maybe that has something to do with it, but it’s not in my 3 months or older folder but still says approved when I go to the book page. You better get reading Fractured, girl! I flew through a book I’m not loving last night to get that one off my queue today. I wrote how much I loved a certain author and that’s how I got an Edelweiss approval. I think I’ll only use it for authors I like in the future.

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              1. BAHAHA! I have no idea what my last few words in my last comment were, after a late Parent Teacher night I wanted to blog a bit but didn’t realize how tired I was smh SORRY! to be completely honest, I’ve had The Bone Witch sitting in my queue less than 3 mths but have been dragging my feet for reasons. I don’t know why I do this (MUST STOP!) but I checked reviews after getting approved, in my defense it WAS one of my 1st Netgalley requests & noticed the mixed reviews. Plenty of not so happy thoughts on the format of it since it jumps back & forth in time but can get confusing lol. I dunno but I had high hopes so I hope that when I do get to it that I don’t have the same issues. It’s supposed to be a hyped book for 2017 too. I’ve had a pretty exhausting week work wise which has affected my time with Heartless but I’m about at the halfway point & loving it. Next is def Fractured so glad that I’ve only heard great things about it. Ugh! yea no, I’m being more selective cuz I hate pressure reading lol. Yes, author love seems to get a good response on Edelweiss cuz that’s how I got More Happy Than Not. 1st attempt- DENIED 2nd attempt I went in & let them KNOW how much I LOVE Adam Silvera! haha smh.

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  23. Great post, Jill! I feel like you perfectly summed up everything, and also thank you for sharing these websites. I am on Edelweiss but I actually never requested a book here, I’m not sure why, maybe part of me felt like I wouldn’t get approved, haha. I heard a bit about the others, but since I’m kind of not reading ARCs right now…I’ll keep them on my radar for later, I think 🙂 Thank you for this!

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  24. This is a wonderful post and discussion. It’s funny, the very first book I ever requested was on Edelweiss and I got it about 2 hours after I requested it. Since then I’ve had very little luck with them. I prefer NetGalley and stick to requesting books that I know are ones I really want to read. My problem is that sometimes I have them so far ahead, and am dying to read them, but want to save them for near the publication date!

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  25. Great post! I love NetGalley! I haven’t read too many books yet, but I love how the site is easy to use/understand. I made an account on Edelweiss, but the website is so confusing I don’t know how to work anything. Lol I just recently heard about SocialBookCo, but I haven’t tried it yet!

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    1. Thanks! 🙂 It’s by far the easiest of the sites. I stayed away from Edelweiss the first six months of blogging, then got approved for one book, and I either didn’t hear back or got denied for the rest. I’m over that site. It’s such a pain.

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  26. Great post, Jill! Like plenty of other bloggers, I’m a big fan of NetGalley but I realised pretty early on not to request books just for the sake of it – especially after having one or two that I really didn’t enjoy and had to battle against time to finish haha.

    I totally agree with your rant points. I think it’s a lot easier to get approved for books on NG if you’re in Europe or the USA, so bragging about all the books you’ll never be able to read is not only annoying for the publisher when you don’t read them but also frustrating for people who don’t often get approved. 😦

    I’ve never used any of the other request to review sites, so it’s good to hear your thoughts on those!

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    1. Thanks, Sammie! 🙂 I also learned my lesson with NetGalley pretty quick. People who brag about their ARCs also annoy me. I’m always happy for people when they get a book they really wanted to read, but when I see them rubbing it in someone’s face, then I get irritated by it.

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  27. I’ve won a lot of books from Goodreads Giveaways, and that’s perfect for me since I don’t read them right away (or even before they’re released in stores).

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  28. Fantastic post! Too bad I didn’t see your post before I show off my long list of ARCs. I feel shame (stick my head into the ground). I don’t mean to show off my collection of ARCs and I feel bad if it offended anyone. I am excited to read my ARCs, just time is not on my side, unless I’m retired or unemployed. But you have valid points for everything you wrote here. Then again, I feel it’s up to the publisher to decide who to approve, I may not review on time but eventually I will review. They may want a wide audience than a narrow one and I do take the time to post my reviews in many platforms. Instead of getting paid for my time, I’m getting paid with a book 🙂

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  29. What an informative post! I checked out SocialBookCo and Blogging For Books and they don’t have anything up my alley right now. I’ve received two titles from Edelweiss, one a request and one a Read Now (well, two if you count Wanderer, but I don’t). So I probably should review the Read Now books to help with my Edelweiss requests now that you mention it. I never thought of the Read Nows as possibly hurting me: but it could make sense!!
    With NetGalley, I haven’t requested a book in awhile. I have 6 titles now, down from 7, but many of them aren’t published for awhile. I also received some author emails asking for reads if their books, and though I told them I was honored, I stressed that I probably won’t be able to get to the books for awhile. No deadline, they assured. It’s hard for me to say no when someone asks me a favor.
    The biggest one that bothers me is a set f books an author sent me awhile ago that aren’t exactly my genre…I told him I would read them. I plan to as well. I’m going to be much more responsible with my ARCs and RaRs now that I have less time: before school I never had enough books, and now it’s all about maintaining a delicate balance.
    I may be envious of people who get copies of books that I get denied for, but I try to remember that I’m not in it for the ARCs or free books. It is a perk. So I am always trying to be happy for what I have and for what others get!
    One day, when things settle down, I hope my blog is so good that I feel comfortable enough to request direct from the publisher. But for now, I’m content with my local library and the few sites (GR, NG, etc) that hook me up with books and authors! It is awesome to be a book blogger! We should never forget that!! 🙌🙌🙌

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